THE BEAT GOES ON

Pivot news, resources and thoughts about our favorite color. Find it all here.

Dot Every I, Cross Every T

by Ian Doescher   When I was a kid, I often thought to myself—and probably said to my parents once or twice—”I can’t wait until I’m an adult! I’ll be able to do whatever I want!” If someone had told me, back then, that adulthood contains more forms than freedom, more responsibility than relaxation, I would have, undoubtedly, not been in such a hurry to grow up. Adulting isn’t easy, right? My spouse Jennifer and I are currently involved in an application process that requires a background check for the last five or ten years. No problem, right? Except that, in 2014, we spent three months living in Scotland. While I would not trade our time there for anything, this also means we need to produce a criminal record for that time abroad to ensure that we’re not notorious international criminals who masquerade as law-abiding citizens here at home. When you are an adult, it can feel like you are always jumping through hoops, always dotting another i and crossing another t. The mail arrives and brings a new bill, or a new fee you weren’t expecting to have to pay, or the news of one more phone call you have to make   Read More >>

How To Find Meaning as a Person and Company

by Dave Nieuwstraten   “It is the very pursuit of happiness that thwarts happiness.” These words come from famous psychiatrist Viktor Frankl, who spent three years in a Nazi concentration camp. It was there he learned about the difference between happiness and meaning. Serving as a therapist in the camp, he saw how helping fellow prisoners identify something or someone to live for (meaning) provided great power to make it through suffering. In 1946, Frankl published his book Man’s Search for Meaning and in 1991, the Library of Congress listed Frankl’s book as one of the top ten most influential books in the United States. More recently, researchers have been revisiting this topic of meaning and happiness. In a 2013 article in The Atlantic, the authors noted that “research has found that having purpose and meaning in life increases overall well-being and life satisfaction, improves mental and physical health, enhances resiliency, enhances self-esteem, and decreases the chances of depression.” So, how does one find meaning? The article talks about how happiness can come from getting, while meaning comes from giving. When we seek to help others in need, when we live for something bigger besides ourselves, we can find meaning, and “meaning” lasts longer than   Read More >>

Three Good Things in Good Meetings

by Katie Goodell   As most companies do, Pivot occasionally takes some time to revisit our habits and processes around meetings. It amuses me how many theories there are surrounding the structure of meetings, and a lot of energy in an office can be invested in discussing procedure and “rules” of meetings. Many of us have probably even been in meetings about meetings! How long is the ideal meeting? How often should we meet? How many people should attend? Should we sit down or stand up? What is the ideal temperature for a meeting room? While I’m a firm believer in the answer “it depends” to most questions of that nature, I have found a few meeting truths to be self-evident. Here are three things I see present in all of my favorite coworker meetings, which I try to incorporate into meetings I organize and attend. A leader.I find meetings more enjoyable and more productive when one person is designated to run the meeting. The meeting leader doesn’t have to be the most senior colleague in the room, nor the person who has the most information or is the authority on the topic. You just need someone to take responsibility over keeping   Read More >>

Paying it Forward

by Aaryn Slafky   The other day, I was at a local fast food restaurant (hint: they use cows in their advertising to sell their chicken) with my kids. An older gentleman came in as we were preparing to leave. He ordered only a small coffee. An impulse hit me and a teachable moment for my kids was born. We purchased a chocolate chip cookie and my 9-year-old daughter delivered it, telling him that we thought he might enjoy a little sweet treat with his coffee. He graciously accepted and we shared a moment of mutual joy…for just a dollar. We left with everyone grinning ear to ear. What if you could have those same kinds of moments with your customers? What if you could put a grin on customers’ faces with a small gesture? Perhaps it’s handing a bottle of ice cold water to a customer paying his bill on a hot, sweaty day? Or sending a follow-up email to express congratulations after a customer mentions his teen has been accepted to college. Sharing gaming resource sites with the grandparent ordering Internet for her grandkids to use while visiting. Sending a box of tissues with the technician to give   Read More >>

Customer Love

by Jenny Green   If you’ve ever interacted with Pivot, you may have noticed that customer experience is a primary focus of ours. We love it; some of us go as far as calling ourselves “Customer experience evangelists.” So, when AMA Portland hosted a luncheon event about “Customer Love” recently, it was no surprise that a group of Pivoteers jumped at the opportunity to learn more. The event, which was fittingly held on Valentine’s Day, focused on how Ruby, a local virtual receptionist company, uses “love” as its guiding principle. While listening to Jill Nelson, Ruby’s founder and CEO, share more about how they incorporate love into everything they do, she shared a few thought provoking ideas that resonated with me. One of Ruby’s core values states, “For us, success isn’t measured by the number of phone calls answered, but the number of real, meaningful connections made on behalf of our customers.” Jill elaborated by saying, “More than ever, phone calls win business.” It made me wonder about my behavior. Am I striving to make these real, meaningful connections at every opportunity? Am I intentional about each interaction or am I just going through the motions? Am I listening to what my   Read More >>

The New Pivot Website

Welcome to our new website!  Pivot Group is excited to launch this new site.  The best part?  New opportunities to connect with you, our clients (and soon-to-be clients).  Take a look around, invite your friends, take off your coat and stay a while.  Remember, this is your home, too.

Three Good Things in Good Meetings

by Katie Goodell   As most companies do, Pivot occasionally takes some time to revisit our habits and processes around meetings. It amuses me how many theories there are surrounding the structure of meetings, and a lot of energy in an office can be invested in discussing procedure and “rules” of meetings. Many of us have probably even been in meetings about meetings! How long is the ideal meeting? How often should we meet? How many people should attend? Should we sit down or stand up? What is the ideal temperature for a meeting room? While I’m a firm believer in the answer “it depends” to most questions of that nature, I have found a few meeting truths to be self-evident. Here are three things I see present in all of my favorite coworker meetings, which I try to incorporate into meetings I organize and attend. A leader.I find meetings more enjoyable and more productive when one person is designated to run the meeting. The meeting leader doesn’t have to be the most senior colleague in the room, nor the person who has the most information or is the authority on the topic. You just need someone to take responsibility over keeping   Read More >>

Using Emojis in Email, Gmail Trends and More

by Abby Lambert   Connect emotionally with emoji In recent years, the use of emoji in mobile and email marketing has skyrocketed. Similar to the way texting has changed how we interact on a daily basis, emoji* are now a form of communication that are familiar and attractive to email subscribers. You can use emoji in your preview text or in your subject line to grab attention. Emoji also allow you to say more with less words. Things to consider when using emoji: Some emoji are more popular than others, but don’t let that limit your choices. Any emoji that visually and/or emotionally reflect your message can be effective. You can use emoji in several locations: your subject line, preview header text, and the body of your email. Note: emoji may not display the same in all email clients – be sure to test your email in the most popular clients before sending. For more details, read more here.   Gmail continues to grow and improve Gmail now owns 20% of the email client space with more than 1 billion monthly users—with 75% of them on mobile devices. Litmus lists Gmail as #2 in their top 10 most popular email clients, second   Read More >>

The 10 Commandments of Customer Engagement

by Ian Doescher   Customer engagement is more important than ever. This article isn’t exactly Moses on Mount Sinai, but here are the 10 commandments of customer engagement we all should keep in mind: Thou shalt engage your customers, for to do so is to build relationships. One of the most effective way to win new customers and keep your existing customers it to form authentic relationships with them. Relationship marketing became a buzzword in the late 1990s, and its importance for marketers hasn’t waned. With tools like social media, customer engagement is easier than ever. That said, you still need to be intentional about how you do it. Thou shalt go where the customers already are. When you are thinking of engaging your customers, don’t expect them to come to you. A lemonade stand on a quiet block in front of a child’s house won’t do nearly as well as the enterprising young lemonade seller who takes her booth to the finish line of the local 5K, or to the summer street fair when temperatures are in the 90s. Don’t expect to engage your customers by having them come to you. Instead, go where they are: to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, to their   Read More >>

Too Good To Be True?

by Katie Goodell   I’m an optimist. I tend to trust people and assume positive intent of individuals as well as companies marketing and selling to me. This attitude, of course, has its benefits and its drawbacks to me as a consumer. My fiancé, on the other hand, is a skeptic. Especially when it comes to sales and marketing. If he sees a product on sale at a significantly lower price than usual, he assumes it’s too good to be true. “That’s fake!”  If some promotion is advertised, he expects there’s an unspoken catch. “Katie, it’s a scam, don’t buy it!” Usually he’s being overly cautious, but I’ll admit, sometimes he’s right! As searching for the best deal becomes more and more possible, especially with online shopping, it’s easy to become blind to quality in your hunt for the lowest price. This can make us bargain shoppers more susceptible to buying a knock-off product or falling for a complicated promotion that ultimately gets us to spend more than we originally anticipated. Because of the possibility of being burned in tricky sales promotions, more advertising skeptics are born. For these deal-doubters, compelling marketing and the promise of a good sale can sometimes have   Read More >>

Business Responses to Tragedy

by Ian Doescher   As a nation, we face tragic events regularly. Whether it is a natural disaster, a mass shooting, an outbreak of a deadly illness, or a terrible accident, we often find ourselves faced with moments of senseless loss. As a business – to say nothing of individuals – it can be hard to know how to respond. Social media has introduced us all to the world of the immediate. Companies have the opportunity, and sometimes the privilege or responsibility, of commenting on tragic events shortly after they happen. There is, however, potential in these moments for companies to make mistakes. We are human, and sometimes we let what might be an appropriate individual response get in the way of an appropriate corporate response. Here, then, are some dos and don’ts when it comes to responding to tragedy as a company, particularly on social media:   Things you can do: 1. Express sympathy. No matter what the tragedy, it is appropriate to say that your company and your employees are holding the victims of a particular tragedy in thought, in prayer, etc. A simple statement of sympathy is enough to acknowledge the tragedy and show you care. 2. Let   Read More >>

YEP. YOU’VE SEEN IT ALL

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